Frequently Asked Questions2018-06-08T11:42:04-04:00
Did you know?2019-12-04T14:10:21-05:00

Did you know?

> Some young children with developmental delays may catch-up to their typically developing peers with appropriate interventions. Others may not.

> Medicaid is currently the primary funding stream for programs and services and supports offered to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities after the age of 21 and is the funding stream for many related services for the school-age population.

> Children with disabilities may qualify for Medicaid regardless of family income? Even families with incomes well over that allowed by Medicaid can apply and may have their child deemed Medicaid eligible.

> The Medicaid Waiver is NOT a program but a funding stream that pays for certain services and supports “waiving” some of the strict Medicaid rules and regulations.

> The right to a free and appropriate education (FAPE) is an entitlement under federal law for all children of school-age (5-21) and for children ages 3-5 that are deemed eligible for special education.

> After the age of 21, adult programs are NOT an entitlement under the law. Rather, you will have to advocate to obtain adult services and supports.

> New York State has always had the most comprehensive array of services available to meet the needs of children and individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities in the country.

> Dually-eligible and dually-diagnosed are NOT the same thing. An individual who is dually-eligible is eligible for funding from Medicaid and Medicare. A person who is dually-diagnosed is usually someone with a developmental disability and a   psychiatric diagnosis or a chemical dependency or a medical diagnosis.

> Your son/daughter can have private insurance as well as Medicaid.

> If you are being evicted or threatened with eviction, you can call 212-962-4795, the City-Wide Task Force on Housing Court.

> All New Yorkers without health insurance, including people who are undocumented, can receive healthcare from Community Health Centers (CHCs) and from the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC), or the NYU Free Clinic.

> The U. S. Department of Transportation has a Hotline for air travelers with Disabilities: 1-800-778-4838.

> You can call the NYC Human Resources, at 877-472-8411, for information on Medicaid Home Care eligibility.

> For Food Stamps and Food Programs, you can call the Emergency Foodline at 311 or toll-free at 866-888-8777.

> You need to call the TOTLINE, at 800-577-BABY, to make a referral for Early Intervention Services.

> Once your son or daughter with a developmental disability reaches the age of 18, no matter what his or her cognitive capacity, you are NO longer his or her legal guardian unless you file a petition for guardianship with the Surrogates Court in your borough of residence.

> A traumatic brain injury incurred before the age of 22 is considered to be a developmental disability whereas the same injury if incurred after the age of 21 is NOT a developmental disability.

> If an individual has a Special Needs Trust, he or she may still be eligible for Medicaid.

> An individual may receive multiple services under the OPWDD Medicaid Waiver.

> An individual with a developmental disability may receive different services from many different provider organizations.

How can I help AHRC NYC support people with disabilities?2019-03-05T15:09:01-05:00

How can I help AHRC NYC support people with disabilities?

There are many ways that you can support AHRC New York City and the people we provide services to:

The AHRC New York City Foundation offers a variety of options for donating funds in support of our cause.

Visit our website’s Volunteer page to learn about the variety of ways you can help.

You can also support what we do by following us on Facebook and helping to pass along vital information through your own personal network.

> LEARN MORE ABOUT WAYS THAT YOU CAN HELP

 

 

How do I apply for a job at AHRC NYC?2019-12-04T14:08:38-05:00

How do I apply for a job at AHRC NYC?

We encourage all interested job candidates to use our Online Job Portal to review and apply for available positions. The online portal contains a regularly updated list of positions that are currently open and which allows you to submit your resume for consideration using an on-line application process. To view our Online Job Portal or to learn more about the application process, please visit the Careers section of this website.

What kinds of jobs does AHRC NYC offer?2018-06-08T11:48:55-04:00

What kinds of jobs does AHRC NYC offer?

AHRC New York City offers a variety of employment opportunities including Direct Care, Clinical, Social Work, Teaching, Finance, Case Management, and IT. To learn more, please visit the Careers section of this website.

Who can I speak to to learn more about AHRC NYC’s services?2018-06-08T11:49:03-04:00

Who can I speak to to learn more about AHRC NYC’s services?

If you would like general information about the services offered by AHRC New York City, please call our Referral and Information Center at 212-780-4491.

Are evaluations available through AHRC NYC that can determine if a person has an intellectual or developmental disability?2019-12-04T14:11:31-05:00

Are evaluations available through AHRC NYC that can determine if a person has an intellectual or developmental disability?

Yes. AHRC New York City has a staff of qualified professionals available to conduct evaluations such as psychological evaluations; psychiatric evaluations; medical evaluations; nursing, nutrition and podiatry evaluations; occupational, speech and physical therapy evaluations.  Arrangements can be made to provide other evaluations as needed. For more information, please call our Referral and Information Center at 212-780-4491.

What kind of services does AHRC New York City Offer?2018-06-08T11:49:11-04:00

What kind of services does AHRC New York City Offer?

AHRC New York City offers individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities a wide range of programs, services and supports tailored to meet their specific needs. For information on services offered at AHRC New York City, please visit the Services & Supports section of this website.

What does AHRC stand for?2019-12-04T14:09:29-05:00

What does AHRC stand for?

After years of advocacy across the nation and internationally by individuals served and their families, the term “mental retardation” is no longer used. In its place, the terms intellectual and other developmental disabilities are utilized in both common parlance and now in State and Federal law.

AHRC New York City chose to continue using the acronym AHRC, as we have been known as such for 70 years. We no longer use the words that the letters AHRC once represented.

Where is AHRC New York City located? How can I get there?2018-06-08T11:49:21-04:00

Where is AHRC New York City located? How can I get there?

AHRC New York City has over 100 locations throughout the five boroughs of the City. You may visit our locations page to see these facilities. AHRC New York City’s headquarters is located at 83 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, and is easily accessible using public transportation.

By Train: J,M,Z,4 or 5 to Fulton Street / 2 or 3 to Wall Street / A or C to Broadway/Nassau
By Bus: M1 or M6 to Cortlandt Street / M9 or M15 to Maiden Lane
By Ferry: Whitehall Terminal (South Ferry)

General Information on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities2018-06-08T11:49:27-04:00

General Information on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

An intellectual or developmental disability is a disability that originates before the age of twenty-two and is expected to continue indefinitely. It is attributable to a condition such as cerebral palsy, epilepsy, neurological impairment, autism or traumatic brain injury, when such conditions result in impairment of general intellectual functioning or adaptive behavior. Impairment of intellectual functioning means that a person has an intellectual quotient (an IQ as measured by a standardized IQ test) which is two or more standard deviations below the mean (an IQ of 70 or less using a scale with a mean of 100 and a standard deviation of 15). Impairment of adaptive behavior means that the person has overall adaptive behavior which is significantly limited in two or more skill areas (communication, self-care, home living, social skills, community use, self direction, health and safety, functional academics, leisure and work). These limitations are a direct result of the person’s cognitive deficits.

A developmental delay is slowed or impaired development in a child who is under five years of age and who is at risk of manifesting a developmental disability because of the presence of one or more of the following: chromosomal conditions associated with intellectual and developmental disabilities; congenital syndromes associated with delay in development; metabolic disorders; prenatal infections and significant medical problems; low birth weight; postnatal acquired problems known to result in delays; or delays of 1.5 standard deviations or more in the area of communication, and/or self-help, and/or social emotional, and/or motor skills, and/or sensory development, and/or cognition.

AHRC NYC recognizes that all individuals, regardless of their